A Pakistani Entity Allegedly Included On Email With Sensitive Nevadan Voter Information – DOJ Has Been Notified

True the Vote describes itself as a non-profit “organization engaged in educating citizens on matters related to election integrity.” In a letter sent to the DOJ on December 3rd, True the Vote informed the department that a Pakistani CEO’s email was included on an email (an email sent from the State of Nevada) that included voter registration information. The Epoch Times has reported on this as well.

Here’s Link To Letter Sent To The DOJ

In the letter, Catherine Engelbrecht, President of True the Vote, says that the nonprofit has been in the process of requesting “updated voter registration rolls from Secretaries of State offices throughout the country.”

When her group received an email response from Nevada’s Secretary of State, an additional email address was CC’d on it. According to the letter, the email is associated with Waqas Butt, CEO of Kavtech Solutions Ltd.

Kavtech’s website describes itself as being based out of Pakistan and specializing in Data Management, Data Visualization, Computer Vision, Game Development, Mobile App Development, Web Application. They say they perform data management for governmental clients, although it is unclear what government(s) they provide services for.

The nonprofit claims that the existence of a foreign entity’s email address on an email with personal information of private Nevadan citizens is evidence of a breach in Nevada’s election or email system.

“Obviously, the problems that such a breach may evidence include access to at least the voter registration information of Nevada residents. At worst it could reveal a breach that gives foreign power access to not only the State of Nevada‚Äôs systems but also to the email systems of anyone whom the State communicates with via email.”

Currently, the Trump campaign is planning on appealing to the Nevadan Supreme Court, after a lower court had thrown out a lawsuit filed by the Trump campaign on November 17. The lawsuit calls into question the high voter counter and alleges USB drives were used to change the vote-total.